Back in February, YIMBY revealed the first renderings of DDG’s new tower coming to 180 East 88th Street. Now, YIMBY has also learned that the project’s 521-foot height (it has seen a bump from 469 feet) will make it the tallest building north of 72nd Street.

A tipster has also sent along demolition photos, which show the old tenements that formerly occupied the site have now been cleared to make way for the 31-story building.

A tower of this height could be lost in the canyons of the Financial District or Midtown, but the upper reaches of the East Side are relatively short, and this part of Carnegie Hill is particularly dominated by low-rise structures. It will surpass the current leader, at 1214 Fifth Avenue on the corner of 102nd Street, by eight feet.

The site’s base elevation of approximately 80 feet will give the tower a little extra boost when it comes to overall prominence, and the building will add a new apex to the neighborhood skyline. There are many buildings with larger floor counts in the vicinity, but none will have the average ceiling heights of 180 East 88th Street, which will approach 16 feet. DOB filings indicate the tower will total 151,458 square feet, which will be split between 48 condominiums.

New construction in the vicinity is much more contextual than in most parts of New York, and most projects feature facades dominated by masonry rather than glass. Other nearby examples including 151 East 78th Street and 1010 Park Avenue, the former designed by Peter Pennoyer and the latter by Beyer Blinder Belle.

DDG’s addition will be faced in handmade brick, but the cantilever and crown will give it a strong contemporary edge. The firm designs and builds its projects in-house.

Back in February, YIMBY revealed the first renderings of DDG’s new tower coming to 180 East 88th Street. Now, YIMBY has also learned that the project’s 521-foot height (it has seen a bump from 469 feet) will make it the tallest building north of 72nd Street.

A tipster has also sent along demolition photos, which show the old tenements that formerly occupied the site have now been cleared to make way for the 31-story building.

A tower of this height could be lost in the canyons of the Financial District or Midtown, but the upper reaches of the East Side are relatively short, and this part of Carnegie Hill is particularly dominated by low-rise structures. It will surpass the current leader, at 1214 Fifth Avenue on the corner of 102nd Street, by eight feet.

The site’s base elevation of approximately 80 feet will give the tower a little extra boost when it comes to overall prominence, and the building will add a new apex to the neighborhood skyline. There are many buildings with larger floor counts in the vicinity, but none will have the average ceiling heights of 180 East 88th Street, which will approach 16 feet. DOB filings indicate the tower will total 151,458 square feet, which will be split between 48 condominiums.

New construction in the vicinity is much more contextual than in most parts of New York, and most projects feature facades dominated by masonry rather than glass. Other nearby examples including 151 East 78th Street and 1010 Park Avenue, the former designed by Peter Pennoyer and the latter by Beyer Blinder Belle.

DDG’s addition will be faced in handmade brick, but the cantilever and crown will give it a strong contemporary edge. The firm designs and builds its projects in-house.

The site also includes the lots at 1556 and 1558 Third Avenue, as well as air rights from 1550, 1552, and 1554 Third Avenue, as well as additional air rights purchased from the neighborhood. Foundation permits have now been approved, meaning construction can actually begin. Completion is tentatively slated for 2018.

– Nikolai Fedak

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88th St. Developer Using ‘Unbuildable’ Lot to Skirt Zoning Rules, Foes Say

UPPER EAST SIDE — Opponents of a skyscraper rising on East 88th Street are calling on the city to reject the project because the developer is “drawing an imaginary line” in order to build taller, they say — a move for which the city previously chided the developer.

Developer DDG’s L-shaped residential tower currently under construction at 1558 Third Ave., at East 88th Street, is set to rise 521 feet after the company carved out a second, 10-by-22-foot lot on the property, plans show.

Because the property borders Third Avenue, the developer is allowed to build higher under that thoroughfare’s zoning regulations, despite the fact that the property technically touches East 88th Street.

To local elected officials and area residents, the new lot was added to skirt zoning rules that prohibit that tall of a building on 88th Street.

The project was previously hit with stop-work order by the Department of Buildings for including a smaller, “unbuildable lot for the sole purpose of evading zoning restrictions.

“If you own a piece of land where the zoning says you can’t build a skyscraper in this part of the district, you don’t get to draw an imaginary line in the sand,” said City Councilman Ben Kallos, who filed the appeal with other elected officials and the Carnegie Hill Neighbors group this month.

Neighbors have already filed two challenges with the Department of Buildings asking that DDG’s plans be rejected, and they filed a third challenge this month asking officials to completely revoke all construction permits.

On March 23, the Department of Buildings issued an “intent to revoke,” warning DDG to refile updated zoning diagrams or else have its construction permits pulled, agency spokesman Alex Schnell said.

The intent to revoke gives a developer 15 days to respond, which they did, Schnell said. Now, the department is working with DDG to get the updated diagrams.

The updated documents should show the 10-by 22-foot lot bordering 88th Street, Schnell said, as the previous diagrams only show a 4-by-22-foot lot that the developer referred to as a “rear yard.”

The stop-work order on that plac was lifted on Dec. 21 and construction resumed, he added.

Opponents said the new “rear yard” is still illegal because nothing can be realistically built on it.

“Pretending this tiny, unbuildable lot was drawn for any other reason than to skirt the neighborhood’s zoning is just silly,” said Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer, who supports the appeal. “We will keep the pressure on and keep insisting that the law be enforced.”

DDG did not respond to requests for comment.

– Shaye Weaver

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